The Tombs of Atuan

      Ursula K. Le Guin

The Tombs of Atuan

Librarian's Note: For an alternate cover edition of the same ISBN, click here.

When young Tenar is chosen as high priestess to the ancient and nameless Powers of the Earth, everything is taken away - home, family, possessions, even her name. For she is now Arha, the Eaten One, guardian of the ominous Tombs of Atuan.

While she is learning her way through the dark labyrinth, a young wizard, Ged, comes to steal the Tombs' greatest hidden treasure, the Ring of Erreth-Akbe. But Ged also brings with him the light of magic, and together, he and Tenar escape from the darkness that has become her domain.

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    Tehanu

      Ursula K. Le Guin

Tehanu

Length: 8 hrs and 33 mins

Years ago, they had escaped together from the sinister Tombs of Atuan—she, an isolated young priestess; he, a powerful wizard. Now she is a farmer's widow, having chosen for herself the simple pleasures of an ordinary life. And he is a broken old man, mourning the powers lost to him through no choice of his own.

Once, when they were young, they helped each other at a time of darkness and danger and shared an adventure like no other. Now they must join forces again, to help another in need -- the physically and emotionally scarred child whose own destiny has yet to be revealed.

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    A Wizard of Earthsea

      Ursula K. Le Guin

A Wizard of Earthsea

Ged, the greatest sorcerer in all Earthsea, was called Sparrowhawk in his reckless youth.

Hungry for power and knowledge, Sparrowhawk tampered with long-held secrets and loosed a terrible shadow upon the world. This is the tale of his testing, how he mastered the mighty words of power, tamed an ancient dragon, and crossed death's threshold to restore the balance.

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    The Other Wind

      Ursula K. Le Guin

The Other Wind

*A wizard, a mender of pots, a king, a dragon, and a burnt girl face the power of the dead. *

The sorcerer Alder fears sleep. He dreams of the land of death, of his wife who died young and longs to return to him so much that she kissed him across the low stone wall that separates our world from the Dry Land--where the grass is withered, the stars never move, and lovers pass without knowing each other. The dead are pulling Alder to them at night. Through him they may free themselves and invade Earthsea.

Alder seeks advice from Ged, once Archmage, Ged tells him to go to Tenar, Tehanu, and the young king at Havnor. They are joined by amber-eyed Irian, a fierce dragon able to assume the shape of a woman.

This group can confront the threat only in the Immanent Grove on Roke. Joining them, Alder, a mender of pots, may be the only one who can mend the world.

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    Ursula K. Le Guin

      Ursula K. Le Guin

Ursula K. Le Guin

"Resistance and change often begin in art. Very often in our art, the art of words."
—Ursula K. Le Guin

When she began writing in the 1960s, Ursula K. Le Guin was as much of a literary outsider as one can be: a woman writing in a landscape dominated by men, a science fiction and fantasy author in an era that dismissed "genre" literature as unserious, and a westerner living far from fashionable East Coast publishing circles. The interviews collected here—spanning a remarkable forty years of productivity, and covering everything from her Berkeley childhood to Le Guin envisioning the end of capitalism—highlight that unique perspective, which conjured some of the most prescient and lasting books in modern literature.
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    The Farthest Shore

      Ursula K. Le Guin

The Farthest Shore

Book Three of Ursula K. Le Guin's Earthsea CycleDarkness threatens to overtake Earthsea: the world and its wizards are losing their magic. Despite being wearied with age, Ged Sparrowhawk -- Archmage, wizard, and dragonlord -- embarks on a daring, treacherous journey, accompanied by Enlad's young Prince Arren, to discover the reasons behind this devastating pattern of loss. Together they will sail to the farthest reaches of their world -- even beyond the realm of death -- as they seek to restore magic to a land desperately thirsty for it.With millions of copies sold worldwide, Ursula K. Le Guin's Earthsea Cycle has earned a treasured place on the shelves of fantasy lovers everywhere, alongside the works of such beloved authors as J. R. R. Tolkien and C. S. Lewis.

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    Tales From Earthsea

      Ursula K. Le Guin

Tales From Earthsea

The tales of this book, as Ursula K. Le Guin writes in her foreword, explore or extend the world established by her first four Earthsea novels. Yet each tale stands on its own.

"The Finder," a novella set a few hundred years before A Wizard of Earthsea, presents a dark and troubled Archipelago and reveals how the school on Roke came to be.

"The Bones of the Earth" features the wizards who taught the wizard who first taught Ged and demonstrates how humility, if great enough, can rein in an earthquake.

"Darkrose and Diamond" is a delightful story of young courtship showing that sometimes wizards can pursue alternate careers.

"On the High Marsh," from the brief but eventful time of Ged as Archmage of Earthsea, tells of the love of power--and of the power of love.

"Dragonfly" shows how a woman, determined enough, can break the glass ceiling of male magedom. Taking place shortly after the last Earthsea novel, it also provides a bridge--a dragon bridge--to the next Earthsea novel, The Other Wind.

The author concludes this collection with an essay about Earthsea's history, people, languages, literature and magic, and provides two new maps of Earthsea.

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    Dangerous People

      Ursula K. Le Guin

Dangerous People

When it was first published in 1985, Ursula K. Le Guin's ambitious and experimental novel Always Coming Home, a tapestry of interwoven stories, poems, histories, myths, and anthropological reports from the fictional Kesh society, included one chapter from a novel called Dangerous People by Arravna, or Wordriver, which Le Guin had "translated" from the Kesh, the invented language of an invented people who "might be going to have lived a long, long time from now" in a post-apocalyptic Napa Valley, California.

Now Library of America presents, for the first time, the full text of the short, innovative, and perceptive novella Dangerous People, which Le Guin completed shortly before her death, making this Le Guin's final new work.

The story of one missing woman and the people around her who may or may not be implicated in her death or disappearance, Dangerous People explores larger questions about what—in relationships, in...
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    Five Ways to Forgiveness

      Ursula K. Le Guin

Five Ways to Forgiveness

Here for the first time is the complete suite of five linked stories from Ursula K. Le Guin's acclaimed Hainish series, which tells the history of the Ekumen, the galactic confederation of human colonies founded by the planet Hain. First published in 1995 as Four Ways to Forgiveness, and now joined by a fifth story, Five Ways to Forgiveness focuses on the twin planets Werel and Yeowe, two worlds whose peoples, long known as "owners" and "assets," together face an uncertain future after civil war and revolution.
In "Betrayals" a retired science teacher must make peace with her new neighbor, a disgraced revolutionary leader. In "Forgiveness Day," a female official from the Ekumen arrives to survey the situation on Werel and struggles against its rigidly patriarchal culture. Embedded within "A Man of the People," which describes the coming of age of Havzhiva, an Ekumen ambassador to Yeowe, is Le Guin's most sustained description of the Ur-planet Hain. "A Woman's...
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    Dancing at the Edge of the World

      Ursula K. Le Guin

Dancing at the Edge of the World

“I have decided that the trouble with print is, it never changes its mind," writes Ursula Le Guin in her introduction to Dancing at the Edge of the World. But she has, and here is the record of that change in the decade since the publication of her last nonfiction collection, The Language of the Night. And what a mind — strong, supple, disciplined, playful, ranging over the whole field of its concerns, from modern literature to menopause, from utopian thought to rodeos, with an eloquence, wit, and precision that makes for exhilarating reading.|

“I have decided that the trouble with print is, it never changes its mind," writes Ursula Le Guin in her introduction to Dancing at the Edge of the World. But she has, and here is the record of that change in the decade since the publication of her last nonfiction collection, The Language of the Night. And what a mind — strong, supple, disciplined, playful, ranging over the whole field of its concerns, from modern...

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